FAQ

    • How does Property Inspections work?

      Answer

      By entering your location, Property Inspections will match you with a selection of qualified inspectors close to your inspection location.

      After selecting your prefered inspector, both you and the inspector will be emailed the booking details.

      For your protection, all businesses on the site are 100% insured (through Rapid Solutions).


    • My inspection business is not plotted on the map correctly

      Answer

      We utilise Google Maps to determine the results for Property Inspections.

      To overide the location that Google has plotted your business on the map:

      • Go to 'My Profile' and select 'Company Details'.
      • Scroll down to the 'Latitude/Longitude' section and enter your correct coordinates.
      • You can find your coordinates using many free services that can be found through a Google search.
      • You must be the main adminitrator for your account to change this setting.
        If you only have one account for Report Writer (no technician accounts) then you will already be the administrator.
  • Building Inspection

    • What is a Standard Building Inspection?

      Answer

      The Standard Building Inspection is a VISUAL INSPECTION ONLY carried out in accordance with AS 4349.1: Inspection of Buildings. The Building Inspection is NOT an all encompassing inspection dealing with the building from every aspect. It is a reasonable attempt to identify any obvious or significant defects apparent at the time of the inspection. Whether or not a defect is considered significant, depends, to a large extent, upon the age and type of the building inspected.

      For example, slight sagging in a roof may be a significant defect on a structure that is 2 years old, but not on a structure that is 40 years old.

    • Which inspection and report is best for me?

      Answer

      That depends.

      If you would like a report concentrating on any significant defects (remembering a defect classed as significant is based upon the type and age of the building) a Standard Building Inspection should be sufficient.

      If you would like a detailed report concentrating on any type of fault or defect, a Special Purpose Property Inspection may be more suited to your needs. Again, Special Purpose Property Inspections may differ depending upon the company you use and the inspector's qualifications. Always check as to what is included in their Special Purpose Property Inspection to ensure it meets your needs.

    • What does the Standard Building Inspection and Report cover?

      Answer

      The Building Inspection Report will normally report on any significant defects in each of the following areas:

      • The interior
      • The roof void
      • The exterior
      • The subfloor
      • The roof exterior
      • The property within the boundaries up to 30 metres including fences, but will not report on pools, spas or ponds etc.

      The Building Inspector normally would not check the adequacy of the following:

      1. Footings
      2. Concealed damp-proof course
      3. Electrical installations, smoke detectors and residual current devices
      4. Plumbing
      5. Drainage
      6. Gasfitting
      7. Airconditioning
      8. Garage Door opening mechanisms
      9. Swimming pools and associated pool equipment
      10. The operation of fireplaces and chimneys
      11. Alarm Systems
      12. Intercom Systems
      13. Soft floor coverings including carpet and lino
      14. Appliances including whitegoods
      15. Paint Coatings
      16. Hazards

      However, the inspector may make recommendations in the report to have a duly qualified consultant inspect these areas.

    • What about minor faults or defects?

      Answer

      While a Standard Building Inspection will normally report on significant defects, a Special Purpose Property Report may include the inspection and assessment of the following:

      1. Common property areas
      2. Environmental concerns including aspect, sunlight, privacy, streetscape, views, aesthetic considerations and spatial layout
      3. Proximity of property to flight paths, railways and busy traffic
      4. Noise Levels
      5. Health and safety issues, e.g. allergies, soil toxicity, lead content, radon, presence of asbestos or urea formaldehyde
      6. Heritage concerns
      7. Security concerns
      8. Fire protection
      9. Analysis of site drainage, apart from surface water drainage
      10. Swimming pools & spas (non-structural)
      11. Detection and identification of illegal and unauthorized building work
      12. Detection and identification of illegal and unauthorized plumbing work
      13. Durability of exposed finishes
      14. Document analysis, e.g. sewer drainage diagrams, strata plans and records and identifications surveys
      15. Electrical installation where the consultant holds an appropriate licence or permit
      16. Property not included in the standard property inspection.
      17. A reasonable estimate of the cost of rectification of any significant matters
      18. A recommendation as to repairs and maintenance work needed to reduce or eliminate the risk of substantial damage.

      IMPORTANT: Unlike a Standard Building Inspection, a Special Purpose Property Inspection will differ from company to company based upon the inspector's qualifications. Always check with the company you intend to use as to what is included in their Special Purpose Property Inspection to ensure it meets your needs.

    • What is an invasive inspection?

      Answer

      With the permission of the owner of the premises a more invasive physical inspection can be performed that involves moving or lifting: insulation, stored items, furniture or foliage during the inspection.

      Access will be gained to areas, where physically possible and considered practical and necessary, by way of cutting traps and access holes.  The style of report submitted on completion of an invasive inspection will be greater than a VISUAL INSPECTION. It involves disruption in the case of an occupied property, and some permanent marking is likely.

    • What areas of the property are inspected?

      Answer

      Only structures and fences within 30m of the main building and within the boundaries of the site are inspected. The inspector will inspect and report upon the property interior, roof void, subfloor, property exterior, any outbuildings, fences and retaining walls etc.

    • What about inaccessible areas where an inspection is not possible?

      Answer

      No inspection is conducted, and no report is submitted, of inaccessible areas. These include, but may not be limited to, locked rooms, cavity walls, concealed frame timbers, eaves, flat roofs, fully enclosed patios subfloors, soil concealed by concrete floors, fireplace hearths, wall linings, landscaping, rubbish, floor coverings, furniture, pictures, appliances, stored items, insulation, hollow blocks/posts, etc.

      However, the inspector will look for signs that may indicate that a significant defect could exist. If this is the case an invasive inspection will be recommended in the Building Inspection Report. It is then up to you in conjunction with the homeowner (if different) to accept the recommended invasive inspection.

    • How do I request a building inspection?

      Answer

      For your convenience you can request a building inspections with a qualified and insured inspector online - Request an inspection now!

  • Pest Inspection

    • My next-door neighbor has termites and is going to have his house treated. Are the termites going to attack my house next?

      Answer

      Termites move randomly through the soil searching for a source of food (wood), so they don't know where where your house is exactly.

      If your next-door neighbour treats his home for termites, your house isn't automatically the termites' next lunch. Your house does not need to be treated; but, if there are active termite infestations in your neighbourhood, it is a good idea to have it inspected.

    • When are termites most common?

      Answer

      Once a colony is established, termites are a year-round problem. However, there is an increase in colony expansion activity during warm weather.

    • What is a Timber Pest Inspection?

      Answer

      A Timber Pest Inspection is a VISUAL INSPECTION ONLY carried out in accordance with AS 4349.3 Inspection of buildings Part 3: Timber Pest Inspections. The Inspection is confined to reporting on the discovery, or non discovery, of infestation and/or damage caused by subterranean and dampwood termites (white ants), borers of seasoned timber and wood decay fungi, present on the date of the Inspection.

    • If treatment is done correctly, how long will the termiticide barrier be effective?

      Answer

      Before chlordane was taken off the market as a termiticide in May of 1988, it was the most widely used product for termite control because of its long-term effectiveness. In fact, a house could be protected for 20 years or more using chlordane or like products.

      Chlordane was taken off the market because of misuse. The termiticides used today for termite control are much less persistent in the environment than the older chemicals. With the products today, you should expect a properly applied termite treatment to protect your home for five years.

    • What about inaccessible areas where an inspection is not possible?

      Answer

      No inspection is conducted, and no report is submitted, of inaccessible areas. These include, but may not be limited to, locked rooms, cavity walls, concealed frame timbers, eaves, flat roofs, fully enclosed patios subfloors, soil concealed by concrete floors, fireplace hearths, wall linings, landscaping, rubbish, floor coverings, furniture, pictures, appliances, stored items, insulation, hollow blocks/posts, etc.

      However, the inspector will look for signs that are conductive to timber pest infestation such as high moisture areas, timber in ground contact, dead trees or stumps and poor ventilation and drainage. If the inspector feels that timber pest activity and/or damage may exist in concealed areas, an invasive inspection will be recommended in the Timber Pest Inspection Report. It is then up to you in conjunction with the homeowner (if different) to accept the recommended invasive inspection.

    • What is an invasive inspection?

      Answer

      With the permission of the owner of the premises a more invasive physical inspection can be performed that involves moving or lifting: insulation, stored items, furniture or foliage during the inspection.

      The inspector will physically touch, tap, test and when necessary force/gouge suspected accessible timbers. Access will be gained to areas, where physically possible and considered practical and necessary, by way of cutting traps and access holes.

      The style of report submitted on completion of an invasive inspection will be greater than a VISUAL INSPECTION. It involves disruption in the case of an occupied property, and some permanent marking is likely.

    • Does the Timber Pest Inspection and Report guarantee that the property is or is not free of timber pest activity or damage?

      Answer

      No. The inspection is limited to a VISUAL INSPECTION ONLY in accord with the requirements of AS 4349.3.

      The visual inspection DOES NOT include breaking apart, dismantling, removing or moving objects including, but not limited to, foliage, mouldings, roof insulation/sisalation, floor or wall coverings, ceilings, floors, furnishings, appliances or personal possessions.

      The inspector WILL NOT dig, gouge, force or perform any other invasive procedures unless a more invasive physical inspection is accepted by the owner of the premises.

      Again, if the inspector is concerned with the possibility of concealed timber pest activity and or damage, an invasive inspection will be recommended in the report.

    • What can I expect to see in the Timber Pest Inspection Report?

      Answer

      The Timber Pest Inspection Report is quite detailed, anywhere from 7-15 pages long and will comment on, but is not limited to:

      • All areas inspected
      • All areas not inspected
      • Areas in which the inspection was obstructed or restricted
      • Areas in which an invasive inspection is recommended
      • High risk areas where full access should be gained
      • Whether Timber Pest activity and/or damage was located
      • Whether signs of a possible previous termite treatment was located
      • Whether a termite management program is required
      • The overall degree of risk of subterranean termite infestation to the property
      • All areas that are considered conductive to Timber Pest activity
      • Recommended frequency of future inspections
    • What areas of the property are inspected for timber pest activity and damage?

      Answer

      Where safe and accessible, including the Interior of the Building, the roof space, the exterior of building, the sub-floor space, the roof exterior and the property site within 30m of the inspected building.

    • Why is it important to have a Timber Pest Inspection and Report carried out?

      Answer

      If you are going to invest hundreds of thousands of dollars into a property, you need to be aware of the degree of risk of timber pest infestation. Even though the report is not a guarantee that timber pest activity and or damage does or does not exist, it is the best possible guide.

      The limitations in carrying out the inspection may be great, however, if the inspector has concerns a more invasive inspection will be recommended. Not only that, the report will also outline how you can make the property less conductive to potential timber pest infestation.

      The price you pay for a Timber Pest Inspection is small considering the value of your property, or the property you are considering purchasing. But, the information you receive in the report is valuable when making a decision on your home or investment.